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Not All Lamps Are Created Equal

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Not All Lamps Are Created Equal

Did you know that not all white light is created equal? Many of our integrated LED fixtures and LED drop-in lamps come in a variety of color temperatures – from warm white to pure white to cool white – that can enhance the colors in your home’s exterior and landscape. Known as Kelvin (K) temperature, consider these suggestions for placement:

 

Warm White 2700 Kelvin Color Temperature for Landscae Design Tips

Pure White 3000 Kelvin Color Temperature for Landscae Design Tips

Warm/Soft White

2700K

Choose warm white for:

  • Surroundings with warmer colors, like brown or cedar
  • Natural-colored walls or stonework
  • Foliage with red, orange or yellow tones (ex: highlighting oak trees)

Pure White

3000K

Choose pure white for:

  • Surroundings with dark materials, like deep slate, black or gray
  • Foliage with blue or purple tones (ex: highlighting blue spruce trees)

 

 

Cool White 4000 Kelvin Color Temperature for Landscae Design Tips Bright White 5000 Kelvin Color Temperature for Landscae Design Tips

Cool White

4000K

Choose cool white for:

  • Contemporary homes and structures
  • Commercial applications
  • For a 120V – 277V system, you’ll need a licensed installer

Daylight

5000K

Choose bright white for:

  • Illuminating evergreen trees and shrubs
  • Commercial applications
  • For a 120V – 277V system, you’ll need a licensed installer

 

 

 

 

LUMENS

Before the advent of LEDs, most light bulbs were incandescent, and you could tell how bright they were by how much power they consumed. So if you needed to replace a lightbulb, you’d look at the wattage on the top—35 watts, let’s say—and go to the hardware store to pick up a new 35 watt bulb. So people got used to talking about lamp brightness in terms of watts, which worked fine at the time even though watts aren’t really a measure of brightness.

When LEDs came on the scene it generated a lot of confusion because they could generate a lot more brightness using a lot less power—so we needed a different measurement for brightness. That’s why we started using a unit that measures brightness called “lumens.” Using lumens, we can now compare all kinds of different lamps based on their brightness. Let’s look at a chart comparing the lumen outputs of the most common landscape lighting bulbs:

 

 

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